Proverbs 12:23 – Blurting it out

The prudent keep their knowledge to themselves, but a fool’s heart blurts out folly. – Proverbs 12:23

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

Some places where else this is discussed:

Proverbs 10:19, 12:16a

My thoughts:

We can be so quick to give our opinion. I know I feel obliged to do so when presented with the news or a personal problem someone shares with me. A bit of prudence can 4218357504_4a48abc9cc_zoften mean that we change from our initial thoughts. This proverb talks of a fool spouting their folly, meaning words that have no value or context. Let’s seek to be slow to speak, in order to edify at the right time, when we have a wise response.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with references, and difficult concepts and words. Plus he has a real way with words!

Photo Attribution: Ekan Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:19 – Temporary Lies

Truthful lips endure forever, but a lying tongue lasts only a moment. – Proverbs 12:19

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts:

Lies do get seen through eventually in some way or other. I found this every time I tried to lie to my parents. My lies didn’t have lasting value, unlike the truth. This proverb 26434249884_d6bb692a22_o.jpgspeaks of truth lasting forever, which can speak of it’s powerful nature here on earth, but also could be of the eternal nature of God’s judgement and kingdom. Only the truth will endure under His rule.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: Felipe Rocha Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:18 – Sharp Tongue

The words of the reckless pierce like swords, but the tongue of the wise brings healing. – Proverbs 12:18

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts: 

Sticks and stones may break bones, but words can cut like a knife. I honestly prefer my version to that saying, because it’s just true. This proverb points to the danger of a loose 8503280372_bbd784c2a3_o.jpgtongue, saying it pierces like a weapon. How often do we let loose the fire-starter that is our mouth! The much wiser way to use our words is to heal and encourage. We have all benefited from such blessing, I’m sure.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: Maurizio Marras Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:17 – Spinning Tales

An honest witness tells the truth, but a false witness tells lies. – Proverbs 12:17

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts:

A courtroom can’t deliver justice when everyone lies. You need truth about a case to get 6800413382_5504eb952e_o (1).jpganywhere, and only an honest witness will avoid spinning a tale. The direct opposite to this is the false witness, whose very nature will reveal dishonesty. Where there are talebearers, you have injustice, and our just LORD will not be mocked forever. I look for the Day of Judgement, when all lies will be stripped of their power.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: Xavier Felip Cat Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:16 – How Vexing…

Fools show their annoyance at once, but the prudent overlook an insult. – Proverbs 12:16

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts:

People are bound to insult you. Whether it’s unintentional or not, you are going to be 9303265297_329af6c890_o.jpgmistreated with words one way or other. Our response shows if we have wisdom at the time. This proverb says some people show annoyance straight away, and therein lies the problem. Determining to respond with deference when insulted is the wisest option. Who wants to look easily manipulated?

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: Alvaro Tapia Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:15 – Foolish Ways

The way of fools seems right to them, but the wise listen to advice. – Proverbs 12:15

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts: 

Being corrected can feel like a slap in the face. To not receive advice, though, could 6938110158_b13b525743_overy well end in a worse outcome than not saving face. We need to be open to other people’s wisdom. They might have insight where we don’t. To be totally secure in our own opinion is a dangerous place to be in.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: sdanii Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0

Proverbs 12:14 – The Value of Words

From the fruit of their lips people are filled with good things, and the work of their hands brings them reward. – Proverbs 12:14

A series of proverbs with this same theme:

Proverbs 12:13-25 (excluding 21 & 24)

My thoughts:

Words have value, just as actions have value. Whether that value is uplifting or 34571596115_fb2a7005b9_o.jpgdestructive is in the hands of the speaker. This proverb is positive in nature, encouraging the listener to seek the good in words, just like we seek good in our actions. Often undervalued are the words of a caring parent or teacher. Let’s aim for good fruit.

Thanks for reading! Pete.

Thoughts or questions? Have your say in the comments section!

Note: All scripture is taken from Bible.com and is the New International Version. I am using a commentary by John A. Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

Photo Attribution: chuchutv online Used under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.0