Home » On Proverbs » The Story of the Crafty Woman and Simple Man (Part 2) – On Proverbs 7:21-27

The Story of the Crafty Woman and Simple Man (Part 2) – On Proverbs 7:21-27

The story which we are following in a two part series has it’s conclusion here in verses 21-27. If you haven’t yet done so, may I encourage you to read the first part of the story (quite long) to get some insight into the full meaning, before you get into the conclusion here.

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This is a heavy story. We’ve read about seduction, blasphemy, and adultery. Surely this isn’t one for teaching your children at the dinner table! But surely it is. When are they going to learn to remain pure for their spouse if you don’t teach them when they are young? I’m not saying you are any more graphic than the passage itself is, though, as that isn’t so smart. All teaching needs to be done in wisdom and love.

In verses 6-20 the characters were introduced (the young man with no understanding and the crafty adulteress), and the woman revealed her nature, expressed her desires, and gave her preposition. In these last verses of chapter 7, we will see the end and conclusion to this sad tale.  

As in the first post we will read the story and then I’ll comment on it. Let’s read.

The Outcome.

21 With her enticing speech she caused him to yield, with her flattering lips she seduced him. 22 Immediately he went after her, as an ox goes to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks, 23 till an arrow struck his liver. As a bird hastens to the snare, he did not know it would cost his life.  

The Author’s Conclusion.

24 Now therefore, listen to me, my children; pay attention to the words of my mouth: 25 do not let your heart turn aside to her ways, do not stray into her paths; 26 for she has cast down many wounded, and all who were slain by her were strong men. 27 Her house is the way to hell, descending to the chambers of death.

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Electric Bill (Flickr)

The woman’s forwardness rooted the man to the spot, and then her enticing words bound him tight. He didn’t so much as murmur, “No!”, before he took her bait. By going by her house at night, he had been asking for trouble and did more than half the work for her. She offered her steaming pie of lust, and he immediately went in to sup.

Biggest mistake ever. “Do whatever feels good or makes you happy,” is the dangerous call of evildoers. There is no guarantee that you will be making it out in one piece! The young man went into her house healthy and never got out again. As an ox to the slaughtering yards he went meekly and met his doom. Proverbs say he metaphorically took an arrow to the liver. That’ll drop you dead for sure.

Now this story seems to indicate he suffered death for his troubles, and I’m wondering if Solomon exaggerated the outcome to serve as a severe warning against adultery. It made me sit up; what about you? What sort of death is this if not physical? As I’ve pondered about other parts of Proverbs, I believe this is a spiritual murder. Simply put, you give up your morals for this woman, and she will give them back mutilated and unusable. Such is the outcome of giving into such an arrangement.

Solomon urges us not to turn aside to the adulteress’ house. Keep your heart from straying because of it’s desires and save yourself from this sin. The end has been shown to us. Pay attention to his words. We have been warned. Amen.

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Your turn: Is the Bible’s assessment lining up with yours when it comes to this issue of sexuality? If not, why not?

 

Note: All scripture is taken from Biblestudytools.com and is the New King James Version. I am using a commentary by John Kitchen for help with difficult concepts and words.

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